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09 Jan What types of fish to catch in Saint Brandon?

The magnificent atoll of Saint Brandon is world known in fishing circles for multiple species of large Trevally and Bonefish who often grow close to record breaking sizes. Some anglers even argue that there is no better destination than St Brandon for Bonefishing. If you decide to indulge in a sport fishing holiday, Saint Brandon should be at the top of your bucket list. Here’s what you can look forward to catching in the Cargados Carajos waters!

Bonefish:

The bonefish (Albula vulpes) is the type species of the bonefish family (Albulidae), the only family in order Albuliformes. The bonefish weighs up to 19 lb (8.6 kg) and measures up to 90 cm (35 in) long. The color of bonefish can range from very silver sides and slight darker backs to olive green backs that blend to the silver side.[3] Slight shading on the scales often lead to very soft subtle lines that run the flank of the fish from the gills to the tail. The bases of the pectoral fins are sometimes yellow.

Giant Trevally:

The giant trevally, Caranx ignobilis (also known as the lowly trevally, barrier trevally, giant kingfish, or ulua), is a species of large marine fish classified in the jack family, Carangidae. The giant trevally is distinguished by its steep head profile, strong tail scutes, and a variety of other more detailed anatomical features. It is normally a silvery colour with occasional dark spots, but males may be black once they mature. It is the largest fish in the genus Caranx, growing to a maximum known size of 170 cm (67 in) and a weight of 80 kg (176 lbs). The giant trevally is an apex predator in most of its habitats, and is known to hunt individually and in schools.

Bluefin Trevally:

The bluefin trevally, Caranx melampygus (also known as the bluefin jack, bluefin kingfish, bluefinned crevalle, blue ulua, omilu and spotted trevally), is a species of large, widely distributed marine fish classified in the jack family, Carangidae. The species grows to a maximum known length of 117 cm and a weight of 43.5 kg, however is rare above 80 cm. Bluefin trevally are easily recognised by their electric blue fins, tapered snout and numerous blue and black spots on their sides. Juveniles lack these obvious colours, and must be identified by more detailed anatomical features such as fin ray and scute counts.

We also highly recommend to check https://www.sportfisher.mu for more juicy details!


Happy holidays fishing!!

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