17 Apr Saint Brandon, the home and sanctuary to breeding turtles.

Climate change and the subsequent impact on the global environment stands at the fore of many people’s consciousness. That’s why making responsible travel choices has become even more crucial. Throughout the years, Raphael Fishing has made environmental stewardship and ethical visitor’s practices a priority, allowing visitors to enjoy the beauty of Saint Brandon while minimizing human impact over the atoll.

Being a sanctuary to various bird and turtle species, Saint Brandon is the perfect place for green turtles to breed. They nest at intervals of about every 2 years, with wide year-to-year fluctuations in numbers of nesting females. Nests between 3 to 5 times per season. Lays an average of 115 eggs in each nest, with the eggs incubating for about 60 days.

Green turtles, like other sea turtles, undertake lengthy migrations from feeding sites to nesting grounds, normally on sandy beaches. Mating occurs every two to four years and normally takes place in shallow waters close to the shore. To nest, females leave the sea and choose an area, often on the same beach used by their mothers, to lay their eggs. They dig a pit in the sand with their flippers, fill it with a clutch of 100 to 200 eggs, cover the pit and return to the sea, leaving the eggs to hatch after about two months. The most dangerous time of a green turtle’s life is when it makes the journey from nest to sea. Multiple predators, including crabs and flocks of gulls, voraciously prey on hatchlings during this short scamper.

Green turtles are listed as an endangered species. Despite this, they are still killed for their meat and eggs. Their numbers are also reduced by boat propeller accidents, fishnet-caused drowning, and the destruction of their nesting grounds by human encroachment.

We strive to protect the species and provide them a home where they can breed. We have seen a slight increase in the population over the years.

TOP