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05 Jun Essential fishing knots every fisherman needs to know

Every angler needs a few things to be successful: a good rod-and-lure combination, a great location and the ability to tie a few simple but pivotal fishing line knots. Especially when away from all technology and tutorials on how to make a good fishing knot. Saint Brandon is off the grid and has no connections to the outer world, except through satellite phone! 

Knots are the unsung heroes of the fishing scene. They get little press, but all the high-tech tackle and secret tactics in the world won’t help you if your knot slips or weakens your line, causing it to break at the moment of truth. Further, the right knots can help you be more efficient, catch more fish and have more fun.

You don't really need to learn every knot in the books, at least not right away. In fact, the need-to-know fishing knots can be distilled down to six essentials.

Improved Clinch Knot

A stronger version of the Improved Clinch, the Trilene Knot has yielded 100 percent of the line’s original strength when tested on Berkley’s Knot Wars equipment. It was developed by Berkley specifically for use with its monofilament lines, and excels for joining swivels, leaders, and lures to mono and fluorocarbon. After a few practice runs, the Trilene Knot quickly becomes second nature and is especially easy to tie with lighter pound tests.

Palomar Knot

If you learn to tie a particular knot--especially if you fish with a braided line of any kind--make it the Palomar knot. Regarded by anglers as having great knot strength, the Palomar serves a similar function to the improved clinch knot, securing a hook or swivel to one end of your fishing line, or fastening a fly to a fluorocarbon leader while fly fishing.

It's basically just an overhand knot with a doubled-up line, and the hook or lure goes through the loop left before tightening.

The Blood Knot

The blood knot, unlike the Palomar knot and the improved clinch knot, is used to tie a couple of fishing lines together. It’s ideal for use with broken fishing lines or those with odd length or in fly fishing. It’s a valuable fishing skill you can easily learn to improve your fish-catching ability.

Two similar fishing lines of almost the same diameter are often tied together using this knot. However, it can also be used in a makeshift fishing line if you get in a pinch. On the contrary, the Palomar knot and the improved clinch knot are used to fasten fishing lines onto lures or hooks.

Uni to Uni Knot

A standout for joining lines of relatively similar diameter, the Uni to Uni Knot is a great choice for adding a monofilament or fluorocarbon leader to your superline mainline. Such a combination couples the low-visibility and easy-casting properties of fluorocarbon with the phenomenal sensitivity and pulling power of superline. The Uni to Uni preserves up to 90 percent of line strength and is a stronger connection than either the Surgeon Knot or Blood Knot. Note, if you need to join lines of vastly different diameters, the Albright Knot is a great pick.

The Spider Hitch Knot

The Spider Hitch knot can boost the strength of your fishing line. Although it’s less popular, the knot is important for every angler. The knot is designed to support heavy leaders and hooks because it is double-lined.

Moreover, the double-lining provides additional security for your fishing line. For instance, if a single strand breaks while battling with a fish, the other unbroken line holds on strong. It ensures you can keep fighting your catch until you reel in the big fish.

The Surgeon’s Knot

The surgeon’s knot, just like the blood knot, is used to attach or join two different fishing lines together. However, unlike the blood knot, it optimally fastens the two fishing lines with varying diameters together. The knot is a basic fishing component every angler should learn because it’s easy to tie.

If you tend to keep pieces and bits of your old fishing line for use in the future, the surgeon’s knot is perfect for you.

 

Below are more links to resources that we think could be of interest to all you keen and seasoned fishermen alike:

https://www.saltstrong.com/articles/fishing-knots/ (free ebook to download)

http://www.proknot.com/ (Rope Knots & Fishing Knots on waterproof plastic "knot cards".)

http://www.berkley-fishing.com/Berkley-ae-top-five-must-know-knots.html (great explanations)

https://www.animatedknots.com/fishing-knots (animated knots - as it says 😊)

https://www.netknots.com/fishing_knots (test your skills)

 

Happy knotting!

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